Recipe from Jamilya Sharipova

As the weather warms up, Taste Quest HQ can’t get our minds off of refreshing treats. Since tropical vacations are on hold for a while, we’re bringing the vacation to you. Follow the recipe below for a silky-smooth lemon coconut ice cream (no ice cream maker required), then follow along as we trace the world travels of the Mighty Lemon!

Ingredients:
1 can full-fat organic coconut milk
2 tablespoons condensed milk
2 tablespoons confection sugar
Zest of 1 lemon
Juice of 1 lemon
1-2 tablespoons whole milk
1 handful of coconut flakes

If you have an ice cream maker, go ahead and use it! If not, or if you’d like to play the musical shake game, then follow the procedures below:

How to make Ice Cream in a Bag

Materials:
1 Quart-sized resealable bag
1 Gallon-sized resealable bag:
Ice
1/3 cup kosher or rock salt

  1. Combine coconut milk, condensed milk, sugar, lemon zest and juice, whole milk, and coconut flakes in a quart-sized resealable bag and seal tightly, eliminating as much air as possible.
  2. Fill gallon-sized resealable bag ½ full with ice and add 1/3 cup salt on top of the ice. Place quart-sized bag inside ice bag and seal closed. Shake the ice bag vigorously for 10-15 minutes, until ice cream has frozen.
    IDEA! Make it a game: take turns shaking to music, passing the bag back and forth like Hot Potato!
  3. Serve immediately or, for a firmer treat, scoop ice cream into a sealable container and freeze for 20-30 minutes. Top with more coconut flakes if desired and serve.

The Mighty Lemon

From cooking to cleaning to aromatherapy, lemon is ever-present in our lives. The success of this citrus is attributed to its high acidity, fragrant zest, and powerfully tangy taste.

Lemons are such versatile fruits that their acidity allows them to power little lightbulbs. It is believed that lemon is a hybrid between bitter orange and citron, but the origin is unknown despite first mentions in North-east India, Northern Burma, and China. 

Lemon arrived in Southern Italy during Ancient Roman times but was never used until the moment it was picked up in Persia, Iraq, and Egypt around 700 AD. It became an ornamental piece of the early Islamic gardens where different cultivars spread throughout the Mediterranean region and ultimately reached the Americas during the Spanish conquest. After centuries of adaptations, we now have basketfuls of lemon varieties to choose from for all of our cooking adventures.

Here are just a few notable varieties:

  • Bonnie Brae is a smooth, thin-skinned, and seedless lemon, grown mainly in California;
  • Eureka provides abundant harvest all year, thus becoming the most common variety in all supermarkets;
  • Sorrento variety, native to Italy, has a high oil content in the zest, which is ideal for making limoncello;
  • Yen Ben is called true lemon, an Australasian variety, with few seeds and smooth and thin skin. It has a strong flavor and is the best option for lemonades and ice teas.

*****Post pics to @TastequestHQ with how you use lemon in your home and kitchen, and have a chance to be featured!****

Excuse us for now, as we have some ice cream to lick and (for grownups) limoncello to sip.centuries of adaptations, we now have basketfuls of lemon varieties to choose from for all of our cooking adventures. Here are just a few notablevarieties:Bonnie Brae is a smooth, thin-skinned,and seedless lemon, grown mainly in California;Eureka provides abundant harvest all year,thus becoming the most common variety in all supermarkets;Sorrento variety, native to Italy, has a high oil content in the zest,which is ideal for making limoncello;Yen Ben is called true lemon, an Australasian variety, with few seedsandsmooth and thin skin. It has a strong flavor and is the best option for lemonades and ice teas.Send us pictures of how you use lemon in your home and kitchen, and have a chance to be featured! Excuse us for now, as we have some ice cream to lick and limoncello to sip. 125%2 / 2

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